Articles Tagged with injury-attorney-boca-raton

Anyone can catch a cold year-round, but people are most susceptible to the common cold during the winter months, as colder, drier air more easily spreads germs among those indoors. Most people don’t think much of going about their day with the common cold. However, research suggests that if you are sick, you may be a danger to yourself and others on the road.medicine

For example, one study by the Cardiff University’s Common Cold Centre in the U.K. reports that concentration when one is driving with a bad cold or a flu is lowered by 50 percent. To put that into perspective: That’s like drinking four double whiskey shots. Researchers studying the effects of being ill on reaction times behind the wheel discovered that sudden braking became increasingly common among sick drivers, who were much less aware of their surroundings. Instances of drivers hitting the curb went up by a third, as drivers were also apparently less capable of accurately judging the distance. A heavy cold, researchers say, impacts a motorist’s mood, judgment and concentration – all of which play a central role in safe driving.

Aside from this, there are numerous cases of drivers who are impaired by medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – to treat colds, the flu and other conditions. Just recently in South Carolina, a woman was criminally prosecuted in Kranchick v. State for driving impaired on cold medication, which resulted in her losing control of her vehicle on the highway, slamming into a tractor trailer and a smaller truck, killing that vehicle’s driver and seriously injuring a passenger and the tractor-trailer driver.  Continue reading

A man has sued the City of Little Rock, AK, alleging negligence by a 911 dispatcher and negligent hiring of this worker by city officials. windshieldwipers

In Yang v. Little Rock, City et al, plaintiff, acting as the representative for the estates of his wife and son, provides a detailed and agonizing account of the horrific tragedy that resulted in his wife’s death that same day, and his young son’s two years later.

The greatest challenge in this case will be overcoming governmental immunity, which is afforded to cities and government workers except in limited circumstances. In many ways, we do expect our emergency responders to expect the unexpected. Governments are expected to have in place reasonably effective systems to address emergencies when they arise. There is also an expectation that employees will be properly vetted and trained and that officials will promptly address problems with workers or systems.

When a woman and her teen daughter prepared to cross an intersection in Jacksonville, they didn’t realize they only had 11 seconds to do so. crosswalk3

The pair were walking to synagogue. It was the Sabbath and it was also Yom Kippur, the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. On those days, Orthodox Jews cannot start electricity or create energy. That meant mother and daughter could not push the “walk” button on the intersection.

Had they been able to push that button, they would have had 50 seconds to cross eight lanes of traffic. But without pushing that button, they had 11 seconds – a fact they didn’t know. At the same time, approaching that intersection was a a 66-year-old man with an alleged vision problem, driving on an expired license. Four years earlier and just a few blocks away, that same driver struck and killed a 6-year-old girl who was crossing an intersection with her mother and brother. That family also didn’t know they needed to push the button for the signal to give them extra time to cross the street.